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5 Great Vapes for Beginners

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Everyone has to start somewhere. Which of these portable vapes are the best for beginners? Answer: all of them! Vapes can be super confusing at first, but these easy to use and easy to care for models will make it all a breeze! Which is right for you?

Atman x Dope Bros Pug Oil Vaporizer Pen

For the oil lover who is just starting out we bring you the Atman x Dope Bros Pug Oil Vaporizer Pen. This pen, made specifically for oily concentrates, is very easy to operate, even for first time users! The pen uses a ceramic heating coil and quartz tank, ideal for heating those concentrates to just the right temperature. It only takes one button to operate, making it perfect for vaping noobs.

KandyPens Donuts Vaporizer

KandyPens are one of the most popular brands of vape pens for both beginners and seasoned pros, and once you try one, it's easy to see why. The Donuts vaporizer completely revolutionizes the old style of vape pen by getting rid of the traditional coil heating systems, and instead replaces it with a state of the art ceramic heating chamber, which slowly heats up your favorite waxes and makes it impossible to burn them! This could not be more perfect for the beginner who has not figured out ideal heat settings. The foolproof 3 temperature setting makes it pretty much impossible to mess up.

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The PAX 2 is a great model for beginners!

PAX 2 Portable Dry Herb Vaporizer

The PAX 2 is an older model, but it still is one of the highest quality dry herb vapes on the market, and it’s a great model for those who are just getting started. The PAX2 has a quick heat up time, and 4 distinct temperature settings of 360, 380, 400, and 420 (heh) degrees F, making it easy to vape your dry herbs in style! The PAX 2 even detects when it’s not being used and goes into standby mode, helping you to prevent burning your precious herbs! Once you become more familiar with vapes, we do recommend that you make the switch to the newer and better PAX 3 model.

Proto Vape Vaporizer Pipe

The Proto Vape vaporizer pipe is not an electronic vaporizer, and that is just fine! Some people are just not technologically inclined, or don’t have the money to invest in an electronic vape. The Proto Vape allows you to either vape or just smoke a bowl, all with the help of a simple screw on attachment.

Vapir Prima Vaporizer

Last and certainly not least we have the Vapir Prima portable vaporizer. This vape stands a bit above the rest of the entries on this list because it allows you to vape both herb and concentrates. The Vapir Prima is also exceptionally easy to care for, and is made to handle some of the stickiest buds and waxes that seem to clog lesser vapes. The temperature presets make it easy to not only customize your vaping experience, but do it the right way. What more could a beginner ask for?

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      Knowing when and how to harvest your buds is as important as knowing how to grow weed.
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